Gender Norms Across the World

Social behavior with regard to and in reaction to inequality is intrinsically linked to an individuals’ own (first-order) norms regarding inequality, but also to his/her perception of social (second-order) norms. It is well known that social norms can give rise to inequality of opportunities, for example when it comes to opportunities for women in the labor market. Yet, systematic international evidence regarding the strength and effects of social norms on the link between individuals’ own norms and their social behavior is limited. In collaboration with a globally operating survey company, this subproject will collect attitudinal survey data in a large number of countries to measure key social norms regarding gender norms in the labor market. Depending on the results, it will also complement classical survey data with in-survey experiments. Such experiments would ideally include information treatments regarding true values, which allows to determine how the (mis-)perceptions of such norms may limit or enhance economic opportunities for various socio-economic groups, including women earning low incomes. The project is high-risk in its comparative, large-scale ambition. Its high return is that it can contribute with high quality evidence on social norms that will be valuable in other sub-projects of the URPP and beyond.

 

Prof. David Yanagizawa-Drott, Department of Economics

Prof. David Yanagizawa-Drott
Project Leader
Department of Economics

Data used

In collaboration with a globally operating survey company, this subproject will collect attitudinal survey data in a large number of countries to measure key social norms regarding gender norms in the labor market. Depending on the results, it will also complement classical survey data with in-survey experiments. Such experiments would ideally include information treatments regarding true values, which allows to determine how the (mis-)perceptions of such norms may limit or enhance economic opportunities for various socio-economic groups, including women earning low incomes.

Data not yet available.

For further information about the project and data please contact: david.yanagizawa-drott@econ.uzh.ch